Understanding the Public Sector Wage Freeze

By Cole Reyno On 4 May, the Labour Government announced a three-year extension to the public sector pay freeze. This freezes the wages of public sector workers earning over $100,000 per year, and most earning over $60,000 per year except in “exceptional circumstances”.[1] This policy will largely impact those workers described as Labour’s traditional voter… Read More Understanding the Public Sector Wage Freeze

Shift in Foreign Policy: New Zealand, Five Eyes, China and the Uyghur:

By Sara Khatau New Zealand, though a small country, has gained a big reputation for being a moral superpower. In the aftermath of the March 15th terror attacks, the world celebrated New Zealand’s strong rejection of Islamophobia. New Zealand recently signalled a desire to assert its brand of value-based politics at the Christchurch call. However,… Read More Shift in Foreign Policy: New Zealand, Five Eyes, China and the Uyghur:

DELEGATE APPLICATIONS FOR 2021 ARE NOW OPEN!!

APPLY TO BE A DELEGATE HERE The Public Policy Club has some amazing initiatives planned for 2021, and we’d love to give our wonderful members the opportunity to be involved! There are THREE distinct roles that you can apply for: a High Schools Coordinator, a Content Creator, or a Competitions/Event Coordinator High Schools Coordinator Tertiary Coordinator… Read More DELEGATE APPLICATIONS FOR 2021 ARE NOW OPEN!!

Blog | Leaving 2020 Without an EU-NZ Free Trade Agreement in Sight

By Callia Drinkwater Bested only by China and Australia, the European Union is New Zealand’s third-largest trading partner. [1] In 2008, New Zealand entered a Free Trade Agreement (FTA) with China, [2] and in 2018 an agreement with Australia, but in 2020 we’ve still got standard tariffs with Europe. From the outset, it would seem… Read More Blog | Leaving 2020 Without an EU-NZ Free Trade Agreement in Sight

Blog | Road to Reconciliation: Theorizing Rwanda 1994 and Post-Conflict Resolution

By Pau Sicat The Rwandan genocide in 1994 is widely regarded as the deadliest and “the fastest mass killing in history”. It was led by the Rwandan military with at least 600,000 Tutsis and Hutus killed within the short span of a few months. To answer what the common causes of genocide are, we can… Read More Blog | Road to Reconciliation: Theorizing Rwanda 1994 and Post-Conflict Resolution

Blog | Nothing To Lose: Lessons from Portugal’s Drug Policy Reform

By Pau Sicat It is quite rare that a government would propose drastic solutions like decriminalising all drugs as a way to alleviate the country’s drug problems, yet Portugal has done just that. Current day Portugal is like a dream come true for recreational drug users. In 2001, the government decriminalised all drugs, and sought… Read More Blog | Nothing To Lose: Lessons from Portugal’s Drug Policy Reform

Blog | Governing In Times Of Crisis: Poll Booster?

By Nick Howell Labour is leading the pack coming up to the general election of 17 October. How have they gained such a formidable lead? Is it due to their handling of the COVID-19 crisis or the fumbling of the National Party? Labour is contesting the upcoming election from an unprecedented position of power; the… Read More Blog | Governing In Times Of Crisis: Poll Booster?