Articles

Understanding the Public Sector Wage Freeze

By Cole Reyno On 4 May, the Labour Government announced a three-year extension to the public sector pay freeze. This freezes the wages of public sector workers earning over $100,000 per year, and most earning over $60,000 per year except in “exceptional circumstances”.[1] This policy will largely impact those workers described as Labour’s traditional voterContinue reading “Understanding the Public Sector Wage Freeze”

Shift in Foreign Policy: New Zealand, Five Eyes, China and the Uyghur:

By Sara Khatau New Zealand, though a small country, has gained a big reputation for being a moral superpower. In the aftermath of the March 15th terror attacks, the world celebrated New Zealand’s strong rejection of Islamophobia. New Zealand recently signalled a desire to assert its brand of value-based politics at the Christchurch call. However,Continue reading “Shift in Foreign Policy: New Zealand, Five Eyes, China and the Uyghur:”

DELEGATE APPLICATIONS FOR 2021 ARE NOW OPEN!!

APPLY TO BE A DELEGATE HERE The Public Policy Club has some amazing initiatives planned for 2021, and we’d love to give our wonderful members the opportunity to be involved! There are THREE distinct roles that you can apply for: a High Schools Coordinator, a Content Creator, or a Competitions/Event Coordinator High Schools Coordinator Tertiary CoordinatorContinue reading “DELEGATE APPLICATIONS FOR 2021 ARE NOW OPEN!!”

Blog | Leaving 2020 Without an EU-NZ Free Trade Agreement in Sight

By Callia Drinkwater Bested only by China and Australia, the European Union is New Zealand’s third-largest trading partner. [1] In 2008, New Zealand entered a Free Trade Agreement (FTA) with China, [2] and in 2018 an agreement with Australia, but in 2020 we’ve still got standard tariffs with Europe. From the outset, it would seemContinue reading “Blog | Leaving 2020 Without an EU-NZ Free Trade Agreement in Sight”

Blog | Road to Reconciliation: Theorizing Rwanda 1994 and Post-Conflict Resolution

By Pau Sicat The Rwandan genocide in 1994 is widely regarded as the deadliest and “the fastest mass killing in history”. It was led by the Rwandan military with at least 600,000 Tutsis and Hutus killed within the short span of a few months. To answer what the common causes of genocide are, we canContinue reading “Blog | Road to Reconciliation: Theorizing Rwanda 1994 and Post-Conflict Resolution”

Blog | Nothing To Lose: Lessons from Portugal’s Drug Policy Reform

By Pau Sicat It is quite rare that a government would propose drastic solutions like decriminalising all drugs as a way to alleviate the country’s drug problems, yet Portugal has done just that. Current day Portugal is like a dream come true for recreational drug users. In 2001, the government decriminalised all drugs, and soughtContinue reading “Blog | Nothing To Lose: Lessons from Portugal’s Drug Policy Reform”

Blog | Governing In Times Of Crisis: Poll Booster?

By Nick Howell Labour is leading the pack coming up to the general election of 17 October. How have they gained such a formidable lead? Is it due to their handling of the COVID-19 crisis or the fumbling of the National Party? Labour is contesting the upcoming election from an unprecedented position of power; theContinue reading “Blog | Governing In Times Of Crisis: Poll Booster?”

Blog | Green Doctors: How Medical Marijuana is Progressing in New Zealand

by Callia Drinkwater If the cannabis referendum pamphlet seemed slightly out of touch to you when it claimed that “The proposed Bill does not cover medical cannabis… These are covered by existing laws.” you’re not alone. New Zealand legalising medicinal marijuana slipped entirely under the radar for many, and for good reason – it onlyContinue reading “Blog | Green Doctors: How Medical Marijuana is Progressing in New Zealand”

Blog | The New Party on the Block: Who are the Sustainability party?

By Callia Drinkwater Since the 2017 election, six new parties have registered to be included on the 2020 ballot. Among these are a variety of Christian value parties, centerism parties, and a conspiracism party. A familiar face can be found in the Sustainable New Zealand Party, led by former Green Party MP, Vernon Tava. TheContinue reading “Blog | The New Party on the Block: Who are the Sustainability party?”

Blog | Baby Back Benches: Aryana from Young National

This is the fifth of our Bants with Baby Back Benches interviews. Through this series we want our readers to get to know the youth leaders of our political parties, ready for our eventual youth leaders debate, and the upcoming election. If you’d instead like to listen to our complete conversation click here By Paul Simperingham, interviewContinue reading “Blog | Baby Back Benches: Aryana from Young National”

Blog | Bants with the Baby Back Benches: Artie of TOP on Campus

This is the sixth and final of our Bants with Baby Back Benches interviews. Through this series we want our readers to get to know the youth leaders of our political parties, ready for our eventual youth leaders debate, and the upcoming election. If you’d instead like to listen to our complete conversation click here By LiamContinue reading “Blog | Bants with the Baby Back Benches: Artie of TOP on Campus”

Blog | Bants with the Baby Back Benches: Adam of Princes Street Labour

This is the third of our Bants with Baby Back Benches interviews. Through this series we want our readers to get to know the youth leaders of our political parties, ready for our eventual youth leaders debate, and the upcoming election. This edition is with Adam Brand, the Chair of Princes Street Labour If you’d insteadContinue reading “Blog | Bants with the Baby Back Benches: Adam of Princes Street Labour”

Blog | Bants with the Baby Back Benches: Felix of Young ACT

This is the fourth of our Bants with Baby Back Benches interviews. Through this series we want our readers to get to know the youth leaders of our political parties, ready for our eventual youth leaders debate, and the upcoming election. This edition is with Felix Poole, the President of Young ACT NZ If you’d insteadContinue reading “Blog | Bants with the Baby Back Benches: Felix of Young ACT”

Blog | Bants with the Baby Back Benches: Jay of Young New Zealand First

This is the second of our Bants with Baby Back Benches interviews. Through this series we want our readers to get to know the youth leaders of our political parties, ready for our eventual youth leaders debate, and the upcoming election. This edition is with Jay McLaren-Harris the chairperson of Young New Zealand First. By PaulContinue reading “Blog | Bants with the Baby Back Benches: Jay of Young New Zealand First”

Blog | Bants with the Baby Back Benches: Natalie of Greens on Campus

This is the first of our Bants with Baby Back Benches interviews. Through this series we want our readers to get to know the youth leaders of our political parties, ready for our eventual youth leaders debate, and the upcoming election. If you’d instead like to listen to our complete conversation click here By Liam Davies OnContinue reading “Blog | Bants with the Baby Back Benches: Natalie of Greens on Campus”

Blog | The Dragon and the Kiwi: Where are NZ-China Relations headed?

By Liam Davies As New Zealand’s battle with COVID-19 comes to an end, is an economic battle on the horizon? Comments made by Winston Peters have created quite the fuss with China. How will NZs economy fair as China decides how to respond?  A few ‘wrong’ statements A word that comes to mind when thinkingContinue reading “Blog | The Dragon and the Kiwi: Where are NZ-China Relations headed?”

Blog |Left Behind: The Story of New Zealand’s Gig Workers

By Avinash Govind Left Behind: The Story of New Zealand’s Gig Workers Earlier this year, amid the unveiling of the government’s COVID-19 economic response packages, many individuals in a small but growing section of our workforce were left without the ability to access the wage subsidy scheme. While the government programs were designed to easeContinue reading “Blog |Left Behind: The Story of New Zealand’s Gig Workers”

Blog |Evidence-based Policymaking, A Double-edged Sword?

The potentiality and limitations of the role of evidence on decision-making in policy formulation By Pau Sicat In light of the recent rapid changes happening around the world due to COVID-19, many are arguing that adopting a purely evidence-based policymaking approach is required. That it has become more crucial than ever that evidence and scienceContinue reading “Blog |Evidence-based Policymaking, A Double-edged Sword?”

Blog | The COVID-19 Economy: The Crisis and the Government’s Response

By Paul Simperingham COVID-19 has and will continue to have a drastic impact on the New Zealand economy. Global travel has ground to a halt, trade has been reduced, people have lost jobs, and the stock market is extremely volatile. OECD secretary-general Angel Gurria has warned that the economic fallout of this virus will lastContinue reading “Blog | The COVID-19 Economy: The Crisis and the Government’s Response”

Apply to be in the Public Policy Club Exec for 2020!

The Public Policy is opening Executive Committee positions for 2020! We are looking for passionate and self-led students to be a part of our team during a critical election year. In this role, you can work with other PPC team members to create content, competitions or events that increase youth engagement with public policy. YouContinue reading “Apply to be in the Public Policy Club Exec for 2020!”

Blog | Local Election Watch 2019: Electing the Leaders of Our Healthcare System

By Yi Xin Heng Healthcare remains a perennial concern of New Zealanders, which is why the local elections for District Health Board (DHB) candidates should be closely watched. Candidates will be competing against a backdrop of mounting dissatisfaction expressed by both DHB employees and the public. In 2018, for instance, 30,000 nurses were involved inContinue reading “Blog | Local Election Watch 2019: Electing the Leaders of Our Healthcare System”

Blog | Local Election Watch 2019: Declining Voter Turnout – Causes and Solutions

By Paul Simperingham Voter turnout for local elections in New Zealand has been falling since the 1980s, with the 2019 Auckland race set to be the lowest in our city’s history. From 1989 to 2016, mayoral turnout has gone from 57% to 42%, and council voter turnout has fallen from 56% to 43% [1]. Meanwhile,Continue reading “Blog | Local Election Watch 2019: Declining Voter Turnout – Causes and Solutions”

Blog | Local Election Watch 2019: The Role of Mayor

By Jonathan de Jongh With voting papers now out, the local elections offer important decisions regarding local government for the coming few years. Auckland is currently facing issues regarding transport, housing, the environment, and social policy. It is the Council’s role, along with its members and civil servants to implement strategies that help better the AucklandContinue reading “Blog | Local Election Watch 2019: The Role of Mayor”